NB KITSAP


Tenant Commands

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Commander, Navy Region Northwest

KITSAP Commander Navy Region Northwest

Commander, Navy Region Northwest is responsible for coordinating activities of Navy bases in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Alaska, Montana, Wyoming, North Dakota, South Dakota, Minnesota, Iowa and Nebraska. The majority of those facilities are in the Puget Sound area. Primary mission areas for the command’s staff include environmental coordination, regional emergency management and quality of life. While it has coordination responsibility for all naval facilities in the Pacific Northwest, its commander also functions as senior-in-command for Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, Naval Base Kitsap, Naval Magazine Indian Island and Naval Station Everett. More information on the command can be found at www.cnic.navy.mil/cnrnw.

Commander, Submarine Group Nine

KITSAP Commander Submarine Group

A subordinate to Commander, Submarine Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet, Submarine Group Nine exercises administrative control authority for ballistic and guided missile submarines and support units assigned in the Pacific Northwest.

The group commander monitors:

  • Shipboard training, personnel, supply and material readiness of Ohio-Class submarine off-crews.
  • Nuclear submarines undergoing conversion or overhaul at the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard in Bremerton.
  • Overall training and crew certification at the Trident Training Facility.

More information on the command can be found at www.csg9.navy.mil.

Commander, Submarine Squadron 17

Under Commander, Submarine Group Nine, Submarine Squadron 17 exercises command of eight operational SSBNs homeported at Naval Base Kitsap. The command’s mission is to oversee the operational and pre-deployment training/certification of assigned submarines and to ensure each is maintained at optimum readiness to support assigned missions.

Commander, Submarine Squadron 19

Under Commander, Submarine Group Nine, Submarine Squadron 19 exercises command of some of the SSBNs and two SSGNs homeported at Naval Base Kitsap.

The command’s mission is to oversee the operational and pre-deployment training/certification of assigned submarines and to ensure each is maintained at optimum readiness to support assigned missions.

Squadron 19 monitors the performance of assigned crews on some of the submarines undergoing conversion or overhaul at the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard in Bremerton and is responsible for certifying those crews for operations as the ships are returned to service.

Command Fleet Logistics Center Puget Sound

KITSAP Command Fleet Logistics

Located on the shores of Puget Sound, Naval Supply Center (NSC) Puget Sound was established on October 2, 1967, with the consolidation of Naval Supply Depot Seattle, the various functions of Supply Department at the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, and the Naval Fuel Depot Manchester. On March 1, 1993, NSC Puget Sound became the Fleet and Industrial Supply Center (FISC), Puget Sound, and on July 1, 2011, FISC Puget Sound became the Naval Supply Systems Command Fleet Logistics Center Puget Sound (NAVSUP FLCPS), one of eight FLC’s under the command of NAVSUP GLS, providing for the Navy’s logistics needs worldwide.

NAVSUP FLCPS provides a variety of logistics support services and products to Fleet and shore commands of the United States Navy and other military commands and governmental agencies in the Pacific Northwest and the Pacific Rim. As the Navy’s Regional logistics broker for Commander, Navy Region Northwest (NRNW), we deliver combat capability through logistics by teaming with Regional partners and customers to provide supply chain management, procurement, contracting and transportation services, technical and customer support, defense fuel products and worldwide movement of personal property.

Core operations of NAVSUP FLCPS are located throughout the Region, including Naval Base Kitsap (NBK) Bremerton, Bangor and Keyport; Naval Station (NAVSTA) Everett; Naval Air Station (NAS) Whidbey Island; and Naval Magazine Indian Island. We have small detachments located in Hawaii (Ford Island, Kauai, Pearl Harbor) and San Diego. FLC Puget Sound services/support include regional mail, household goods and hazardous material management; integrated logistics; regional transportation; Subsistence Prime Vendor support; material handling equipment; fleet technical screening and material processing; aviation support; NUWC Keyport weapon systems; SWFPAC SSP; Regional Contracting; and defense fuel products.

The Navy’s regional broker for Commander, Navy Region Northwest, FLC Puget Sound is staffed with 69 Navy personnel and 344 civilian employees. FLC Puget Sound delivers combat capability through logistics by teaming with regional partners and customers to provide supply chain management, procurement, contracting and transportation services, technical and customer support, defense fuel products and worldwide movement of personal property.

Marine Corps Security Force Battalion, Bangor

KITSAP Marine Corps Security Force

Marine Corps Security Force Battalion, Bangor traces its lineage from establishment of the former Marine Barracks, Puget Sound Naval Shipyard on September 16, 1896. The barracks grew steadily with the shipyard. Marine Barracks, Bangor was established in January 1964, with the activation of the Ammunition Depot. The barracks was re-designated Marine Barracks, Naval Torpedo Station, Keyport, although it physically remained on board the Bangor annex. On February 1, 1977, with the activation of Submarine Base, Bangor, the barracks was re-designated Marine Barracks, Bangor.

On February 1, 1987, with Marine Corps reorganization of security forces, Marine Barracks, Bangor was re-designated as Marine Corps Security Force Company, Bangor. On July 2, 2008, the company was re-designated as Marine Corps Security Force Battalion.

Currently, Marine Corps Security Force battalion, Bangor is the largest Marine Corps Security Force Battalion in the world. Marine Corps Security Force Battalions are independent commands, capable of self-administration, organized to support and accomplish their own particular mission. Marine Corps Security Force Battalion, Bangor is in direct support of Strategic Weapons Facility, Pacific. Since its reorganization in 1977, the battalion has been awarded a Navy Unit Commendation, three Meritorious Unit Commendations and a Commandant of the Marine Corps Certificate of Commendation.

The Marine Corps Security Force is active in the local community with many key events open to (and directed at) the public. The security forces also assist and support the annual Toys for Tots drive and aid those in need through food drives and other significant community programs.

Naval Facilities Engineering Command Northwest

KITSAP Naval Facilities Engineering Command

Naval Facilities Engineering Command Northwest is a complex, multi-mission, echelon-four command reporting to Commander NAVFAC Atlantic in Norfolk, Virginia, and to Commander, Navy Region Northwest, as regional engineer.

NAVFAC NW provides Public Works Departments to Naval Base Kitsap, Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, Naval Magazine Indian Island and Naval Station Everett. The geographic area of responsibility covers eleven states — Alaska, Idaho, Iowa, Nebraska, Minnesota, Montana, Oregon, North Dakota, South Dakota, Washington and Wyoming.

NAVFAC NW’s diversified programs support planning, design, contracting and construction (including the acquisition and disposal of real estate for the Navy) and assist supported commands in the application of specialized programs such as energy, environment and base closures.

Major clients are Commander, Navy Region Northwest, and subordinate activities, Fleet Logistics Center Puget Sound, Naval Fuel Depot, Manchester, Naval Hospital Bremerton, Naval Hospital Oak Harbor, Naval Undersea Warfare Center Keyport, Naval Acoustic Research Detachment at Bayview, Idaho, Mountain Home Air Force Base, near Boise, Idaho, Navy Training Range in Boardman, Oregon, and all the Navy Reserve Centers in the AOR. Similarly, all of the Navy’s housing assets in these states are also supported.

Naval Operational Support Center KITSAP

KITSAP Naval Operational Support Center

Navy Operational Support Center (NOSC) Kitsap’s mission is to provide leadership, training, facilities and administrative support to 50 Reserve units composed of more than 850 selected Navy Reserve personnel in preparation for mobilization and peacetime contributory support.

Navy Operational Support Center Kitsap has been part of the city of Bremerton and Kitsap County since the early 1920s. With a complement of fewer than 100 persons, the original contingent began operating out of Building 290 at the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard as a Naval Reserve Training Facility under the control of the Seattle Naval Reserve Center. This arrangement continued through World War II and the Korean conflict with Bremerton supplying ready, trained reservists to augment the active Naval Force. By 1977, the Bremerton Naval Reserve numbered eight units and more than 150 Sailors and was officially designated an independent Naval Reserve Center. Navy Operational Support Center Kitsap also serves as the Navy Mobilization Processing Site for Navy Region Northwest.

In December 2007, the Navy Operation Support Center moved from its Bangor location to Building 1013 in Bremerton.

Naval Undersea Warfare Center, Keyport

KITSAP Naval Undersea Warfare Center

Naval Undersea Warfare Center (NUWC), Division Keyport is one of two divisions of the Naval Undersea Warfare Center providing Fleet readiness support for submarines, torpedoes, land attack systems and Fleet training systems.

NUWC Keyport provides advanced technical capabilities for in-service engineering, test and evaluation, logistics support, custom engineered solutions, and other cutting-edge technologies that sustain and maintain our nation’s undersea warfare systems.

NUWC Keyport is headquartered on Washington State’s Kitsap Peninsula, with facilities and operating sites in California, Guam, Hawaii, British Columbia, Nevada and Pennsylvania. NUWC Keyport also sends personnel to service the fleet around the world. The current global workforce consists of about 1,900 civilians and 28 Sailors.

History

At the beginning of the 20th century, both the Pacific Ocean and the undersea domain were becoming increasingly important to the security and prosperity of the United States. America now had colonies and territories in that vast ocean. It had a tiny but expanding submarine fleet. And its leaders watched with interest and alarm as the emergent technology of the self-propelled torpedo was used to devastating effect in naval battles from Chile to China.

The U.S. Navy’s inventory of, and expertise with, torpedoes was struggling to keep pace with other rising powers. But because the effectiveness of even rudimentary torpedoes is based on complex mechanisms for assuring proper guidance, depth, speed, and range, they needed to be tested in the water before being issued for use. This was especially time consuming and expensive for the U.S. Navy’s Pacific Fleet, which had to ship their torpedoes across the country to Newport, Rhode Island, the U.S. Navy’s only depot for testing and repairing torpedoes.

To remedy this situation, in 1908 a group of naval officers was sent to search from San Diego to British Columbia for a location to house a new U.S. Navy torpedo station. The ideal location, they were directed, was to be a “clear water site on the west coast, not over 10 fathoms deep and not under five, with a sandy bottom and virtually no current.” It should also “have little tide and must not be too cold.”

The isolated peninsula of Keyport, Washington, was chosen as that perfect place.

By November, 1914, the Navy had purchased land from local families and commissioned the Pacific Coast Torpedo Station.

By 1919, the Station had grown to include a contingent of U.S. Marines for security, U.S. Navy divers for torpedo recovery work, and a small civilian workforce learning the emerging art and science of testing and maintaining torpedoes. In 1930, the base was renamed the United States Naval Torpedo Station, but then as now was often simply referred to as Keyport.

Even before the U.S entered World War II, many American leaders saw the devastation caused by German U-Boats and realized that was the first conflict in which superiority in the undersea domain would be instrumental to victory. When the U.S. entered World War II, Keyport quickly increased its workforce, reaching nearly 3,000 people by 1944, more than 40 percent of those women. As many as 100 torpedoes were tested in a single day during the most active of the war years.

By the time Japan surrendered, the majority of U.S. torpedoes used in the Pacific Theater had passed through the Keyport. When the War was won, production slowed and the workforce size plummeted. But a new Cold War soon began, and much of that conflict would take place beneath the world’s oceans.

To meet the Navy’s needs in this new era, Keyport had to expand its presence. Torpedoes being produced in the 1950s, made to operate at great depth, couldn’t be tested in the shallow waters around the Keyport peninsula. Fortunately, nearby Dabob Bay was found to have sufficient conditions, and in 1954, Keyport created the world’s first 3-D undersea tracking range in that bay. To share operations and technology with one of America’s closest allies, a joint test range with the Royal Canadian Navy was established near Nanoose, British Columbia, in 1965.

By the end of its first 50 years, Keyport had proven its value to victory in the largest war in history, and was growing well beyond an organization defined by geography and a single type of weapon.

During the Cold War, the U.S. Navy’s role in the undersea domain was providing deterrence by maintaining a technological advantage over the Soviet Navy. The Naval Torpedo Station at Keyport had become such an instrumental part of this strategy that by 1966 they were testing nearly every torpedo used by the Navy. But maintaining and increasing America’s technological advantage undersea meant that Keyport had to do more than just torpedoes, and that it had to operate outside of the Pacific Northwest.

In the 1970s, Keyport helped with naval undersea tests in the Arctic Ocean and added detachments in Indian Island, Washington; San Diego; and Hawaii to keep the unique Keyport expertise closer to the fleet. Keyport also added a detachment in Hawthorne, Nevada, to store and maintain naval mines, and increased work with foreign allies and partners around the world to help keep their warfighting platforms and equipment credible counters to Communist Bloc forces. To better reflect its evolving mission, the station’s name was changed in 1978 to the Naval Undersea Warfare Engineering Station.

By 1992, the Cold War, on which most of Keyport’s efforts had been focused for 40 years, had been won. As it had after other wars, the U.S. military began shrinking its personnel numbers and closing bases. And, as it had in the aftermath of previous wars, Keyport survived, adapted and continued proving its worth to the nation. Keyport went through another name change and became one of two divisions in the newly created Naval Undersea Warfare Center (NUWC) and would now be called NUWC Keyport. NUWC Keyport was no longer tasked with just staying ahead of a single adversary. The uncertainties of the post-Cold War world necessitated the U.S. military sustaining its dominance of the undersea domain while anticipating new threats and exploring new opportunities. NUWC Keyport’s skills and knowledge began to be applied to keeping America’s warfighting advantage on the land and in the air, as well as at sea. In the 2000s, a site on Guam and the Naval Sea Logistics Center in Pennsylvania came under NUWC Keyport, further expanding the geographic reach and Fleet support capabilities.

Today, NUWC Keyport is still headquartered on the little peninsula where it was founded in 1914. It provides an array of services and products to the U.S. Navy, other military branches, and allied militaries, all with the goal of enhancing the competency and innovation in undersea warfare capabilities that began a century ago.

Labor and Professional Organizations

The Bremerton Metal Trades Council (BMTC) and the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers (IAM&AW) represent some groups of NUWC Keyport’s civilian employees. The BMTC and IAM&AW are members of the Partnership Council at Keyport and negotiate with management on personnel policies, practices and working conditions. The command also has a consultative relationship with Chapter 99 of the Federal Managers Association.

Recreation Association

The NUWC Keyport Recreation Association is comprised of employees who volunteer their time to sponsor recreational events for the benefit of all military and civilian employees. Operating funds are received from the Food Services Board through a percentage of money collected from food and vending machine sales.

The volunteers organize numerous activities including annual events such as family picnics (Summerfest, Oktoberfest) as well as trips to enjoy skiing, shopping and cultural and sporting events. In addition, they organize sports and games tournaments and offer discounts on tickets for popular events. The Recreation Association also teams with the regional MWR to further offset costs, which helps the events be more successful.

Lagoon Recreation Area

The lagoon offers an area for picnics, paddleboating and walking trails. The covered pavilion has picnic tables with adjacent barbecue pits. The area may be reserved for large parties Friday (after 4 p.m.) and all day Saturday and Sunday from March 1 through Oct. 31. For reservations call 315-7540.

Food Services

The cafeteria, Torpedo Alley Galley, is in the southeast corner of Building 489. Vending machines are found in lobbies and in food service areas in buildings throughout the base.

Food services are coordinated by the Food Services Board, composed of NUWC Keyport employee volunteers. They work to ensure quality food services for all employees at Keyport. The board coordinates and administers all aspects of the employee Food Service Program and determines employees’ desires and needs for new or improved facilities and provides them, consistent with available funds.

Public Affairs Office

Public Affairs Officer
Commander, NUWC Keyport

610 Dowell St.
Keyport, WA 98345-7610
396-2699

kypt_pao@navy.mil

Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility

KITSAP Naval Shipyard

Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility is focused on providing customers with high-quality, timely and cost-efficient maintenance, modernization, and technical and logistical support. PSNS & IMF has sites in Bremerton, Bangor, Everett, San Diego, Japan and wherever its workers are needed to fix ships.

PSNS & IMF is under the Commander, Pacific Fleet, and is operated by Naval Sea Systems Command. The depth of skill and experience in the command’s highly trained workforce continues to pay dividends to the fleet. PSNS & IMF personnel maintain and modernize the Navy’s fleet throughout the world, and it is a command that streamlines all efforts and actions to support the mechanics’ nonstop execution of workflow, thus increasing productive capacity.

PSNS & IMF, Bremerton site, is situated on 179 acres of property bordered on the south by Sinclair Inlet, on the west by Naval Base Kitsap, and on the north and east perimeters by the city of Bremerton. The Bremerton site is the Pacific Northwest’s largest naval shore facility, employing approximately 13,600 civilians and military personnel, and one of Washington State’s largest industrial installations. And, as NAVSEA’s largest repair facility, PSNS & IMF is unique in its ability to perform work on all Navy platforms, including surface ships, aircraft carriers and submarines. It is also the Navy’s sole facility authorized to recycle end-of-life nuclear-powered submarines and ships after designing and developing the process in the late 1970’s.

The Bangor site provides industrial support for the incremental upkeep and repair of Trident submarines and the Trident Planned Equipment Replacement Program. The facility’s industrial refit operation leads the command in training Sailors in the journeyman mechanical rates on critical skills to ensure they are fully proficient in performing essential at-sea repairs when they return to the fleet.

Highly skilled production workers in a number of trades execute ship maintenance, giving ships a like-new environment. Engineers and planners keep their eyes to the future, using innovative thinking, planning and design concepts to keep America’s Navy No. 1 in the world.

While both locations employ the latest techniques on ships in the fleet, another diverse group of professionally trained engineers, technicians, mechanics and contractors are busily engaged in providing, maintaining and modernizing highly technical facilities and shop equipment that supports this work.

The command’s standard of excellence and professionalism is evidenced by the numerous awards and “well-done” messages regularly received from ships and submarines following work completion. Additionally, the Bremerton and Bangor sites have been recognized by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration as VPP Star Sites.

A Look Back

PSNS & IMF, Bremerton Site

In 1891, the U.S. Navy invested less than $10,000 on 190 acres of Pacific Northwest wilderness and established Naval Station Puget Sound. This happened because of growing national interest in the Pacific Ocean and a new American naval policy of a mobile battleship fleet. Surveyed by Lt. Charles Wilkes in 1841, the Puget Sound offered protected, deep-water port sites. In 1888, a Navy commission, led by the noted naval strategist Alfred Mahan, was appointed to select a site for a Pacific Coast naval station north of the 42nd parallel. Lt. Ambrose Wyckoff finalized the purchase of the original 190 acres for $50 an acre. He formally dedicated the opening of the (then) Naval Station Puget Sound as its founding commandant the same day, Sept. 16, 1891.

The first dry dock construction at Naval Station Puget Sound started in October 1892 and was finished in 1896. With the beginning of the Spanish American War in 1898, the Battleship Oregon sailed from the station 17,000 miles to take part in the naval engagement at Santiago de Cuba. The fact that the Oregon arrived ready to fight proved the value of a West Coast naval base and established Naval Station Puget Sound’s reputation throughout the fleet. In 1901, Naval Station Puget Sound was upgraded to Navy Yard, Puget Sound and until World War II, the Navy Yard was the only West Coast battleship repair facility.

During World War I, many new ships were constructed, including 25 subchasers, two minesweepers, seven oceangoing tugs, two ammunition ships and thousands of small boats. Between 1920 and 1940, the Navy Yard improved its capabilities, enabling it to serve a key role in repairing battle-damaged ships of the fleet and Allies during World War II. Following the U.S. entry into the war, the facility repaired and modernized the five surviving battleships from the attack on Pearl Harbor. Throughout the war, the command repaired, overhauled and refitted hundreds of U.S. and Allied ships, including 26 battleships, 18 aircraft carriers, 13 cruisers and 79 destroyers. The Navy Yard serviced nearly one-third of the 1,006 ships in the U.S. fleet. Additionally, a number of new cruisers and destroyers were built there as well. The workforce reached more than 33,000 people by 1945. At the end of World War II, the Navy Yard had its third name change, as it was designated a naval shipyard, thus becoming Puget Sound Naval Shipyard.

During the 1950s, the shipyard’s major effort was the extensive program of converting aircraft carriers’ conventional flight decks to angle decks as the Navy entered the era of jet-powered aircraft. With the start of the Korean conflict, the shipyard was also busy with the reactivation of ships and the construction of two ships of a new class of guided-missile frigate: Coontz (DLGN 9) and King (DLGN 10). Between 1917 and 1970, 85 major ships were constructed at the shipyard, including the largest naval vessels built on the West Coast: Sacramento-class combat support ships.

In the early 1960s, the shipyard’s mission was transitioned from building to a focus on repair and major maintenance of nuclear submarines, including the overhaul of fleet ballistic missile submarines.

By 1998, that initial $9,500 investment had grown and reorganized into two military bases: Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, now a $2 billion ship maintenance, modernization and repair facility; and Naval Station Bremerton, a world-class homeport for the U.S. Navy fleet.

The shipyard is proud of its history as a naval presence on the West Coast and has the distinction of having a listed National Historic Landmark District within its gates. The district contains 11 industrial buildings, five dry docks, five piers, the iconic hammerhead crane and numerous pieces of historical machinery.

On May 15, 2003, the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and the Naval Intermediate Maintenance Facility, Pacific Northwest, consolidated into one command, thus creating PSNS & IMF. The consolidation improves fleet readiness by allowing the Navy to accomplish the highest-priority, real-time ship maintenance requirements while achieving the most maintenance efforts possible for the tax dollar.

In addition to the PSNS & IMF consolidation, another opportunity to further improve service to the fleet arose in 2003. Surface ship maintenance organizations, including the Supervisor of Shipbuilding, Puget Sound; portions of the Commander, Naval Surface Group; Pacific Northwest Maintenance Staff; and Fleet Technical Support Center, Pacific Det. Everett joined PSNS & IMF in standing up the Northwest Regional Maintenance Center. The NWRMC now provides maintenance for many types of Navy vessels.

PSNS & IMF, Bangor Site, Naval Intermediate Maintenance Facility, Pacific Northwest

Naval Intermediate Maintenance Facility, Pacific Northwest, was established July 31, 1981, as the primary maintenance facility for the West Coast Trident submarine fleet, a year before the arrival of USS OHIO (SSBN 726) — the first of the Tridents to be based in the Pacific. In 1998, IMF, then known as Trident Refit Facility, Bangor, consolidated with Shore Intermediate Maintenance Activity, Everett, and its detachment in Bremerton, and became IMF. On May 15, 2003, IMF consolidated with Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and became Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility. It retained its major command status as the IMF portion of PSNS & IMF, incorporating approximately 600 military service members.

IMF, with its fully integrated workforce of civilian and military personnel, operates refit piers, repair shops and a dry dock in the Pacific Northwest. The Delta Pier at Bangor, so named because of its triangular configuration, can support five SSBNs at one time. It is one of the largest dry docks built by the Navy and is the only dry dock in the world constructed parallel to the shoreline. IMF has expertise in hull, mechanical, electrical, electronics and weapons systems repair and meets the fleet’s maintenance and repair needs with on-time, cost-effective and quality service.

IMF is the leader in training Sailors in critical skills within the journeyman mechanical rates using the Navy Afloat Maintenance Training Strategy program to ensure that essential at-sea repairs and refurbishments of major systems can be completed without the need to return to port for corrective maintenance.

Congressional and Public Affairs Office for PSNS & IMF

The command’s Congressional and Public Affairs officer is the official spokesperson for PSNS & IMF. This office serves as liaison to the public, media and congressional representatives, coordinating special events and publishing the PSNS & IMF employee newsletter, SALUTE, now in its 75th year of publication. The Congressional and Public Affairs Office may be contacted at 476-7111 or psns.pao.fct@navy.mil

Navy Band Northwest

KITSAP Navy Band Northwest

Navy Band Northwest operationally reports to Commander, Navy Region Northwest, and is under the supervision of Director, Navy Band Northwest. The 35-member band performs more than 450 engagements annually throughout the Pacific Northwest, Alaska and Mountain States regions. Entertaining millions each year, Navy Band Northwest supports numerous events including military change of command and retirement ceremonies, the annual Seafair celebration in Seattle, the spring and fall concert series at the Naval Undersea Museum Keyport Auditorium, and the highly anticipated Holiday Concert performances throughout the Puget Sound area. The talented and versatile musicians of Navy Band Northwest comprise 13 performing ensembles, each with diverse musical styles.

For more information please contact:

Director, Navy Band Northwest
1103A Hunley Road
Silverdale, WA 98315
315-3448

NavyBandNW.CNRNW@navy.mil

http://www.cnic.navy.mil/regions/cnrnw/about/navy_band.html.

Strategic Weapons Facility Pacific

KITSAP Strategic Weapons Facility Pacific

Strategic Weapons Facility Pacific (SWFPAC) is responsible for receipt, inspection, storage, assembly, modification, maintenance, repair, on-loading, off-loading and delivery of Trident missile systems, in assembled or component form, to the fleet ballistic missile submarines, as well as having responsibility for waterfront security. SWFPAC is an echelon-three command reporting to Director, Strategic Systems Programs. For area coordination, SWFPAC reports to Commander, Submarine Group Nine in support of refit operations.

Commander Submarine Development Squadron Five

Commander, Submarine Development Squadron Five is the operational command responsible for the maintenance and operation of assigned SEAWOLF Class submarines, submersibles, and the Navy’s Ocean Engineering systems. We also serve as the tactical development authority for SUVs, UUVs, Undersea Acoustic Arrays, and Arctic Warfare.

More information on the command can be found at www.csds5.navy.mil

Trident Training Facility, Bangor

TRIDENT Training Facility (TRITRAFAC), Bangor’s mission is to train officer and enlisted personnel in the knowledge and skills required to build competence and proficiency in operating and maintaining SSBN, SSGN, and SSN submarine systems, sub-systems, and equipment; to provide replacement, conversion, advanced, off-crew, and team training for submarine crews and submarine support personnel; to train officer and enlisted personnel in the knowledge and skills required to build competence and proficiency in operating and maintaining CVN engineering reactor plant systems and equipment; to train officer and enlisted personnel in the knowledge and skills required to build competence and proficiency in operating Integrated Undersea Surveillance Systems; to coordinate Navy Learning Center’s training solutions in the Pacific Northwest, to provide training support and information technology services to staff and student personnel of the command and of remote Learning Center sites; and to provide specialized training and perform such other functions and tasks, as directed by higher authority.

TRITRAFAC has been the proud recipient of the Chief of Naval Education and Training Excellence Award in 1985, 1991, 1992, 1995, 1996, 1999, 2001, and 2005-2007. The TRITRAFAC phone number is 315-2000.

Additional Awards

  • Meritorious Unit Commendation for the period July 1, 2007 to January 1, 2011
  • Meritorious Unit Commendation for the period May 1, 1999 to October 31, 2001
  • CNO Letter of Commendation for the period January 1, 1998 to December 31, 1999
  • Meritorious Unit Commendation for the period January 1, 1991 to June 30, 1992
  • Meritorious Unit Commendation for the period December 1, 1987 to December 31, 1989

U.S. Coast Guard Maritime Force Protection Unit, Bangor

KITSAP Coast Guard

The Maritime Force Protection Unit (MFPU) Bangor conducts submarine security escorts when they are transiting surfaced into and out of homeport. The MFPU conducts escorts as part of the Coast Guard’s statutory missions of Ports, Waterways, and Coastal Security and Defense Readiness. The unit is composed of more than 150 active-duty Coast Guard personnel, including two 87-foot Marine Protector Class cutters, the CGC SEA DEVIL and the CGC SEA FOX.

Contacts:

Commanding Officer 315-4955
Executive Officer 315-4956

USS John C. Stennis

KITSAP USS Stennis

USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74), commissioned on December 9, 1995, is a Nimitz-class nuclear-powered aircraft carrier homeported at Naval Base Kitsap-Bremerton.

Stennis is 4.5 acres of sovereign United States territory capable of traveling to the furthest reaches of the globe. It is 1,092 feet long and rises about 200 feet out of the water. Stennis and her crew provide forward presence and credible deterrence. Stennis conducts sustained air operations, maritime interdiction, counter-piracy operations, humanitarian assistance and disaster relief.

As the John C. Stennis Strike Group flag ship, Stennis hosts an embarked air wing and deploys with as many as six ships, with a population of more than 5,000 Sailors and Marines when the air wing and staff are embarked. Stennis has many of the same amenities as any American city with a comparable population.

Stennis has its own newspaper, magazine, television station, fire department, paramedics, police department, library, recycling center, jail, 50-bed hospital with an intensive care unit, two general stores, laundries, barbershop and even a post office with its own ZIP code. Without the embarked air wing and staff, Stennis’ population is approximately 3,000 Sailors.

Senator John Cornelius Stennis served in the United States Senate for 41 years. Born to a farmer in one of the poorest counties in Mississippi, Stennis’ sense of personal responsibility and strong work ethic led him to become President Pro Tempore, third in line of succession to the presidency.

Stennis stood firm for U.S. military superiority. A strong Navy, second to none, always topped his agenda. This steadfast support led Stennis to earn the moniker, “father of America’s modern Navy.” He is the only senator namesake of a nuclear-powered aircraft carrier.

When announcing this ship would be named after Stennis, then-President Ronald Reagan said, “Senator, when I consider your career there is a certain comparison that comes to mind. In troubled places you’ve brought calm resolve, like one of the great fighting ships you’ve done so much to obtain for the Navy; serene, self-possessed, but like a great ship of the line, possessed of a high sense of purpose.”

In Washington, Stennis had a sign on his desk that represented a part of his personal philosophy. It read “Look Ahead.” As this great ship plies the oceans of the world to ensure peace, it carries the name of a man who did, indeed, “look ahead” for the sake of his country.

The mission of USS John C. Stennis and her embarked air wing is to conduct sustained combat air operations while forward deployed in the global arena. The embarked air wing consists of eight to nine squadrons. Attached aircraft are the EA -18 Growlers, F/A-18E and F Super Hornets, E-2C Hawkeye, MH-60R, MH-60S and C-2 Greyhound.

The air wing can destroy enemy aircraft, ships, submarines and land targets, or lay mines hundreds of miles from the ship. Stennis’ aircraft are used to conduct strikes, support land battles, protect the strike group or other friendly shipping, and implement a sea or air blockade.

In addition to the air wing and accompanying vessels, Stennis has NATO Sea Sparrow and rolling airframe surface-to-air missile systems, the Phalanx Close-in Weapons System (an extreme rapid-firing 20 mm gun) for cruise missile defense and the SLQ-32 Electronic Warfare System.

Stennis’ two nuclear reactors give her virtually unlimited range and endurance and a top speed in excess of 30 knots. The ship’s four catapults and four arresting gear engines enable her to launch and recover aircraft rapidly and simultaneously.

Stennis carries approximately 3 million gallons of fuel for her aircraft and escorts and enough weapons and stores for extended operations without replenishment. Stennis also has extensive repair capabilities, including a fully equipped Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department, an electronics repair shop and numerous other ship repair shops.

USS Nimitz

KITSAP USS Nimitz

USS Nimitz (CVN 68), the lead ship of the Nimitz-class nuclear-powered aircraft carriers, was commissioned in 1975 and is 1,092 feet long and towers some 20 stories above the waterline.

As a self-contained city afloat of more than 5,000 Sailors and Marines with the embarked air wing and staff, USS Nimitz has virtually the same amenities as any American city with a comparable population. It has a newspaper, television station, fire department, paramedics, police department, library, recycling center, jail, 50-bed hospital with an intensive care unit, two general stores, laundries, barbershops and a post office with its own ZIP code. Without the embarked air wing and staff, Nimitz’s population is approximately 3,000 Sailors.

USS Nimitz is named after Fleet Admiral Chester William Nimitz (February 24, 1885 —February 20, 1966), a five-star admiral in the United States Navy. He held the dual command of Commander in Chief, United States Pacific Fleet, for U.S. naval forces and Commander in Chief, Pacific Ocean Areas, for U.S. and Allied air, land and sea forces during World War II. He was the leading U.S. Navy authority on submarines, as well as Chief of the Navy’s Bureau of Navigation in 1939. He served as Chief of Naval Operations from 1945 until 1947. He was the United States’ last surviving Fleet Admiral.

The mission of USS Nimitz and embarked air wing is to conduct sustained combat air operations while deployed in the global arena. When embarked, the air wing consists of 10 squadrons. Attached aircraft are the F/A-18C Hornet, F/A-18E and F Super Hornet, EA-18G Growler, E-2C Hawkeye, MH-60R Sea Hawk, MH-60S Sea Hawk and C-2 Greyhound.

The air wing can engage enemy aircraft, ships, submarines and land targets, or lay mines hundreds of miles from the ship. Nimitz’s aircraft are used to conduct strikes, support land battles, protect the strike group or other friendly ships, and implement a sea or air blockade.

The air wing provides a visible presence to demonstrate American power and resolve in a crisis. Nimitz operates as the flagship of Carrier Strike Group Eleven, which is commanded by a flag officer aboard Nimitz and consisting of two cruisers and six destroyers.

USS Nimitz’s two nuclear reactors give it virtually unlimited range and endurance with a top speed in excess of 30 knots. The ship’s four catapults and four arresting gear engines enable her to launch and recover aircraft rapidly and simultaneously.

Nimitz carries approximately 3 million gallons of fuel for aircraft and escorts, and enough weapons and stores for extended operations without replenishment. Nimitz also has extensive repair capabilities, including a fully equipped Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department that includes a micro- miniature electronics repair shop and numerous ship repairshops.

For defense, in addition to the air wing and accompanying vessels, Nimitz has NATO Sea Sparrow and Rolling Airframe Surface-to-Air Missile Systems, the Phalanx Close-in Weapons System (an extreme rapid-firing 20 mm gun) for cruise missile defense and the SLQ-32 Electronic Warfare System.

Dimensions

  • Length of flight deck: 1,092 feet
  • Width of flight deck: 252 feet
  • Height keel to mast: 23 stories
  • Area of flight deck: 4.5 acres
  • Weight of carrier: 97,000 tons
  • Propulsion system type: Nuclear reactor
  • Number of reactors: 2
  • Maximum speed: More than 30 knots
  • Number of screws: 4 (5 blades each)
  • Weight of screws: 66,200 pounds each
  • Number of catapults: 4
  • Number of aircraft elevators: 4
  • Size of air wing: 80+ tactical aircraft

What is an ombudsman?

When a spouse or parent has a question or concern, they can contact the ship’s ombudsman team. Selected by the commanding officer, Nimitz ombudsmen are spouses of members of Nimitz’s crew who voluntarily serve as official liaisons between the command and its families.

For a spouse or parent of a Nimitz Sailor, it is important to get acquainted with the ombudsman team. You are encouraged to call 360-340-7040 or email them at ussnimitzombudsman@yahoo.com with any concerns you may have. They are “on call” 24 hours a day for emergencies. Non-emergency calls are taken from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 6 to 8 p.m. daily.

The ombudsman team serves as information and referral specialists, recommending community organizations and military offices such as Family Service Centers, chaplain’s office, medical treatment facilities, Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society, American Red Cross and legal assistance offices.

Are you new to Nimitz, or have you moved?

It is important if you have a change of address, phone number or email address, even if temporary, that you contact the Nimitz ombudsman team. If they do not have the correct information, they may be unable to contact you with command information. If you are new to Nimitz be sure to contact your ombudsman team, they have information to help you in your transition to Nimitz.


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