MARCH ARB

Support Services

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Military and Family Support Center

As a gateway to the resources you need, the Military and Family Support Center provides information, support and services to help you balance the demands of military life. The Military and Family Support Center is one part of the overall Family Readiness System, which is the network of agencies, programs, services, partnerships and individuals that supports your personal and family life readiness, mobilization and deployment readiness, and mobility and economic readiness. It should be one of your first stops once you arrive at a new installation. The programs and services are a key resource for you and your family. They include:

Federal Voting Assistance Program (FVAP)

FVAP.gov ensures Service members, their eligible family members and overseas citizens have the tools and resources to register to vote and request an absentee ballot, regardless of their state of residence. The Voting Assistance Guide (VAG) is a reference guide for everything you need to know about absentee voting in all 50 States, territories and the District of Columbia.

Federal Voting Assistance Program (FVAP) The Voting Assistance Guide is available at: www.fvap.gov/vao/vag. Select your state to find your local election office’s contact information.

Voting forms are available at: www.fvap.gov/eo/overview/materials/forms.

Programs and Services

Military and Family Support Centers are part of the network of agencies, programs, services and partnerships which supports the overall well-being of military families. Military and Family Support Centers provide information, education and support programs to help balance the demands of military life. The Military and Family Support Center should be one of your first stops once you arrive at a new installation to connect with key programs, services and support systems. Programs and services may vary across services and installations.

  • Deployment support provides information, education and support to assist you and your family during all phases of the deployment cycle.
  • Relocation assistance provides an array of services during the relocation process to meet your moving needs.
  • Personal financial management provides information, education and one-on-one financial counseling to assist you and your family in maintaining your financial readiness.
  • Employment assistance offers comprehensive information, tools and resources to support career exploration, training and licensing, and employment readiness.
  • Family life education provides information and education to assist you and your family in developing resilience skills that can help as you navigate your mobile military lives.
  • Information and referral can assist you in identifying and clarifying needs to determine appropriate forms of assistance and in locating services and programs available both on and off your installation.
  • The Transition Assistance Program prepares separating, retiring and demobilizing service members (and their families) with the information, skills and knowledge necessary for a successful transition from military to civilian life. The first step in your transition process is to complete the congressionally mandated pre-separation counseling session, which furnishes detailed information on the various benefits and services available.

Military and Family Support Centers may provide other programs, such as the Exceptional Family Member Program, Family Advocacy Program and the New Parent Support Program. These services vary by location.

Deployment Support

Deployment can be a challenging phase of the military lifecycle, but it’s important to know that you don’t have to go through it alone. The military provides a variety of resources and support programs — ranging from educational briefings to morale calls — for your loved ones, children and service members to ease the stress of deployment. Military members may be assigned to a specific installation but support may come from local communities, Yellow Ribbon events or the installation itself.

Family Deployment Support

The Airman & Family Readiness Center is the focal point for family issues/concerns related to deployment, mobilizations, TDY and family separation. Resources are available to assist the member and family members prepare, adapt, and adjust to deployments and the return and reunion. Due to minimum manning, Pre-deployment and Post-Deployment briefings are provided by appointment only.

Briefs are provided to individuals as they are notified of deployment as well as to groups. Spouses are encouraged to attend briefings with the military member. However, due to the wide range of locations in which Reserve families live, if spouses are unable to attend A&FRC staff can send pre-deployment packages to family members. When families live closer to another military installation that installation's A&FRC is engaged to provide readiness services in the family's local community. Annual Deployment Preparedness Training is provided for squadrons as requested.

Contact the Airman & Family Readiness Center at 951-655-5350 for more information.

Employment

Employment Opportunities

Riverside and San Bernardino counties comprise what is commonly known as the Inland Empire, one of the fastest growing metropolitan areas in the nation. Riverside is bordered by San Bernardino County to the north, Orange County to the west, San Diego and Imperial counties to the south and the state of Arizona to the east. The current unemployment rate for the area is 7%.

The following occupations are those deemed to have the fastest job growth:

Computer Software Engineers and Systems Software occupations are expected to experience a 77% increase in the next 5 years with average wages between 60K and 80K. This includes individuals who research, design, develop, and test operating systems-level software, compilers, and network distribution software for medical, industrial, military, communications, aerospace, business, scientific, and general computing applications. Set operational specifications and formulate and analyze software requirements. Apply principles and techniques of computer science, engineering, and mathematical analysis.

Computer Software Engineers, Applications occupations are expected to experience a 68% increase in the next 5 years with average wages between 60 and 100K. This includes individuals who develop, create, and modify general computer applications software or specialized utility programs. Analyze user needs and develop software solutions. Design software or customize software for client use with the aim of optimizing operational efficiency. May analyze and design databases within an application area, working individually or coordinating database development as part of a team.

Database Administrator occupations are expected to experience a 65% increase in the next 5 years with average wages between 45 and 85K. This includes individuals who coordinate changes to computer databases, test and implement the database applying knowledge of database management systems. May plan, coordinate, and implement security measures to safeguard computer databases.

Network Systems and Data Communications Analyst occupations are expected to experience a 66% increase in the next 5 years with average wages between 40 and 75K. This includes individuals who analyze, design, test, and evaluate network systems, such as local area networks (LAN), wide area networks (WAN), Internet, intranet, and other data communications systems. Perform network modeling, analysis, and planning. Research and recommend network and data communications hardware and software. Include telecommunications specialists who deal with the interfacing of computer and communications equipment. May supervise computer programmers.

Industrial Engineer occupations are expected to experience a 65% increase in the next 5 years with average wages between 49 and 78K.

EMTs and paramedic occupations are expected to experience a 50% increase in the next 5 years with average wages between 22 and 33K.

Dental Hygiene occupations are expected to experience a 49% increase in the next 5 years with average wages between 50 and 88K.

Network and computer systems administrator occupations are expected to experience a 49% increase in the next 5 years with average wages between 51 and 80K.

High wage occupations in this area include physicians, attorneys, administrative law judges, economists, physicists, pharmacists and sales managers.

Of the occupations with the most potential for job openings, 88.7% are typically lower paying, entry-level occupations such as Retail Salespersons, Cashiers and Combined Food Preparation and Serving Workers that require a years experience or less. These are typically minimum wage level positions, which in this area is $8.00 an hour. Higher-skilled and higher paying occupations such as Registered Nurse, General & Operations Managers, and both Elementary and Secondary School Teachers are also on the list of positions with potential openings. These higher paying jobs require an AA degree or better.

Transition Assistance Program

As March ARB is a reserve installation the staffing in the Airman & Family Readiness Center allows for the provision of pre-separation counseling for Reservists leaving active duty status. Active duty members who are separating and/or retiring are currently referred to the nearest active duty installation for transition assistance/attendance at seminars. The Airman & Family Readiness Center will contact the active duty installation and make arrangements for attendance at seminars/workshops for both active duty members and separating Reservists who would like to attend.

Financial Assistance

Resources are available to help you understand and manage your finances, including one-on-one financial counseling to assist you and your family with financial readiness. Services are designed to focus on money management issues throughout your active-duty lifecycle and into retirement. Financial readiness educational opportunities range from basic planning to long-term investing. Check out the information below to see what’s available at your installation.

March ARB is located in a high cost of living area. You may incur increases in auto insurance, housing costs, utilities and gas prices.

The March ARB Airman & Family Readiness Center does not have a Certified Financial Manager on staff. We can obtain emergency financial assistance to those who qualify through the Air Force Aid Society (AFAS). Due to lack of staff, AFAS assistance is only provided to those assigned to March ARB. If you do not qualify for assistance from the AFAS, we can assist you in reaching out to other agencies. We also provide referrals for financial counseling to off-base agencies. Contact the Airman & Family Readiness Center at DSN 312-447-5350 or 951-655-5350 for more information.

Family Advocacy Program

The Family Advocacy Program is responsible for the prevention of and response to child abuse and neglect and domestic abuse/intimate partner violence in military families. It works with civilian social service agencies, military and civilian medical providers, law enforcement, legal personnel, chaplains, and child and youth programs to provide a coordinated community response. The goal of the program is to promote the prevention, early identification, reporting and treatment of child and spouse abuse.

Program services vary by installation, but generally include:

· Public awareness campaigns, education and support for couples and parents

· Parenting support at every age and stage, including New Parent Support Program home visits for expectant parents, new parents and families with young children

· Safety planning, advocacy and support for domestic abuse victims

· Clinical treatment for offenders and all affected family members as appropriate

The Family Advocacy Program is the congressionally designated program responsible for the prevention of, and response to, child abuse and neglect and domestic abuse/intimate partner violence in military families. The Family Advocacy Program works in collaboration with military and civilian medical providers, social service agencies, law enforcement, legal personnel, chaplains, and child and youth programs to provide a coordinated community response. The goal of the Family Advocacy Program is to promote the prevention, early identification, reporting and treatment of child and spouse abuse.

Program services vary by installation and generally include the following:

  • Public awareness campaigns, education and support for couples and parents
  • Parenting support at every age and stage, including New Parent Support Program home visits for expectant parents, new parents and families with young children
  • Safety planning, advocacy and support for domestic abuse victims
  • Clinical treatment for offenders and all affected family members, as appropriate

New Parent Support Program

The New Parent Support Program is a team of support staff — made up of nurses, social workers and home visitation specialists — that focuses on providing individualized support for new and expecting parents. Services vary, but may include home visits, parenting classes, playgroups or prenatal classes. Find out what’s available at your installation. Don’t see what you’re looking for? Check out a nearby installation to see if they have additional resources.

General Program Description

The New Parent Support Program offers information, support and guidance to military families who are expecting a child or have a child 3 years old or younger. Services are provided free of charge to eligible families. Program staff provides support in the areas of pregnancy, labor and delivery, infant and toddler care and safety, growth and development, parenting and family relationships through home visits, classes, support groups and referrals to community services. New Parent Support Program staff understands the impact that military life can have on expectant and new families and assists families in coping with these special situations. Program services are tailored to each family's unique circumstances and can help with preparing for parenthood, parenting skills, understanding growth and development, couple communication and stress management.

Staff Qualifications

New Parent Support Program services are provided by registered nurses, licensed social workers and parent educators.

Eligibility

Program services are available to military families with an expectant parent or with children 3 years of age or younger.

Enrollment

To get more information, contact your installation's Family Advocacy Program office. Find your installation on MilitaryINSTALLATIONS and select ‘Family Advocacy Program’ from the drop-down menu. You will find contact information specific to your installation on that page.

Community Resources

There are many community resources available if a NPSP is not available at the nearest military installation. Especially helpful to separated or detached families are the resources of Military OneSource found in their parenting information. Military OneSource can also be reached day or night 24/7 by calling 1-800-342-9647. MilitaryHOMEFRONT, Troops and Family New Parent Support program has wonderful resources for information and referral.

Another valuable resource for finding assistance is the Maternal and Child Health Library providing an online directory for researching services for children and families. In addition, there are several websites dedicated to helping parents bridge the distance gap with their children, Moms Over the Miles and Dads at a Distance. These websites provide guidance and activities for families to help ease the separation.

Relocation Assistance

Relocation assistance can provide support if you’re preparing to move or PCS. The programs and services defined below are provided by the Military and Family Support Center. In addition to the assistance program, a variety of other services may be available. Check the additional information topic to see what unique installation services are available to you.

Programs and Services

If you are approaching a permanent change of station, or PCS, you may have questions about your upcoming move. As part of the Military and Family Support Center, the relocation assistance program provides services and resources to help make this transition as smooth as possible. Below is a listing of resources.

  • PCS planning — Most relocation assistance programs offer counseling/consultations to assist in the moving process. Those making their first military move, those making their first overseas move or those with challenging or complex situations should contact their installation relocation assistance office as soon as possible for information and assistance.
  • MilitaryINSTALLATIONS and Military OneSource — For managing and planning your move, you may want to take advantage of these Department of Defense-sponsored online resources and tools.
  • Loan Closet — Loan Closet offers basic household goods while your personal property is in transit. Typical items include pots and pans, dishes, silverware, irons, ironing boards and infant or toddler car seats. Generally, towels and bed linens are not available, so these should be packed in your express shipment. This service varies by service and installation.
  • Workshops and briefings — Workshops vary from installation to installation, but you may find classes on housing options, moving with children, moving with pets or general moving preparation and resources.
  • Pre-departure briefings — These briefings may be called Smooth Move or PCS Briefing and provide essential information about your next duty station. These briefings can be critical in setting you up for success during the transition to your next duty station.
  • Settling-in services — Welcome Wagon services or local area tours may be a part of your installation’s settling-in services. Overseas arrival services may include introductory language classes and cultural awareness training.
  • Foreign-born spouse support — Whether you have questions or concerns about immigration and naturalization, learning the English language or how to use local transportation, the relocation program provides assistance, classes and referrals.
  • Emergency assistance — From time to time, emergencies occur while moving. The Relocation Assistance Program office has the resources to provide emergency financial assistance and referrals.

Programs and services may vary across the installations.

Installation Specific Information

While Reserve installations do not provide the typical relocation assistance services and do not have the full complement of services found in active duty installations Relocation Assistance Programs, we strive to assist you as much as possible if you are relocating to March ARB. While we have community information that will assist in relocating to this area, we maintain limited information about schools, housing, employment, pets, and medical facilities; we will research and provide details on any areas of concern about your relocation. We will provide on a case by case basis the information that is specific to you and your family in your transition to the March ARB area.

Relocation Assistance

As March ARB is a Reserve installation only limited relocation services are available. Newcomers briefing is held the Saturday of each UTA. Please contact us at 951-655-5350 or DSN 312-447-5350 if you have questions regarding your relocation to March.

Service Specific Information

Resources and services differ by branch of service. These family and community services are specific to your installation. Use the information below to learn more.

Base Services

Airman and Family Readiness Center

Airman and Family Readiness Center, 951-655-5350

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