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What Are the Military Bases in Kentucky?
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What Are the Military Bases in Kentucky?

A visit to Kentucky can offer you many things. The world-famous Kentucky Bourbon Trail is chock-full of some of the finest spirits available to man. Kentucky’s illustrious history provides the backdrop for various scenic views accompanied by wonderful stories. This beautiful countryside is also playing an important part in keeping Americans safe all around the globe. There aren’t many military bases in Kentucky, not counting the abandoned military bases in Kentucky, of course, but those that remain are doing great things in training and preserving the history of the American Armed Forces.

Related read: What Are the Military Bases in Alabama?

What Military Bases Are in Kentucky?

There are two active military bases in Kentucky, and while other branches may find themselves stationed there, they are both run by the U.S. Army. Bases in Kentucky have made a name for themselves on and off of the battlefield. Here are the military institutions in Kentucky fighting for our freedoms every day.

Fort Campbell

Towards the southwest portion of Kentucky, right on the border that separates the Bluegrass State from Tennessee, lies Fort Campbell, home of the infamous 101st Airborne Division. The division is known for its innovative role in helping the Allies win while storming Normandy on D-Day during Operation Overlord. Those who are stationed at Fort Campbell are only a short drive south of downtown Hopkinsville, KY, though Clarksville, TN, is also within proximity.

Fort Knox

One of the most famous forts in the world, Fort Knox is found around 45 miles southwest of Louisville, KY. Home to 12,000 people, Fort Knox covers three counties and is one of the largest military institutions in the United States. Army bases in KY or anywhere in the world don’t come much bigger, but they also don’t come much richer.

Fort Knox is infamous for holding the U.S. Bullion Depository. In total, it holds 4,583 metric tons, which is equivalent to around $291 billion, depending on the market. Even though this is one of the two Army bases in Kentucky, the U.S. Marine Corps is also present. The General George Patton Museum of Leadership is a popular tourist attraction, and fans of James Bond can get to see some familiar sights, as part of Goldfinger was filmed at Fort Knox.

The Blue Grass Army Depot (BGAD)

In addition to the two military bases in KY, there is also the BGAD. Similar to an active Army military base in Kentucky, it is used as a place to store chemical weapons and ammo. The U.S. Army also uses it to repair supplies.

The BGAD is home to most of the explosive munitions used by Soldiers, Chemical Material Surveillance Programs, and the Molten Salt Research and Development Facility. Access is obviously limited to the public due to safety concerns, and the BGAD also conducts quality assurance for the Army as well.

Bluegrass, Bouillon, Bourbon, & Bombs

If you are seeking a military base in Kentucky, you won’t find an abundance, but both are valuable and filled with unique character and history. On top of it all, the military bases in Kentucky are set in some of the most undiscerning yet beautiful landscapes in America. Together, they help control chemical weapons, train our troops, and have even played a part in saving the world.

More like this: What Are the Military Bases in Tennessee?

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