MCB QUANTICO

  1. News
  2. 2019 HITT Championship tests peak physical performers

2019 HITT Championship tests peak physical performers

Last Updated :
MARCOA Media
Story by Sgt Mackenzie Gibson on 09/11/2019
MARINE CORPS BASE QUANTICO, Va.--

Four days, seven challenges, several dozen competitors, but only two may become champions.

Marines from far and wide accept this annual challenge, and there is no exception this year at the 2019 High Intensity Tactical Training Championship aboard Marine Corps Base Quantico, Va., Sept. 9 through Sept. 12.

The championship has been hosted by Marine Corps HITT and Semper Fit for the past five years, and has evolved with every passing year. The HITT program's primary mission is to enhance operational fitness and optimize combat readiness for Marines. The program emphasizes superior speed, power, strength and endurance while reducing the likelihood of injury.

"1-2 instructors have been pulled from major Marine Corps installations," said Staff Sgt. Brandon Atkins, a force fitness instructor for Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, N.C. and Marine Corps Air Station New River, N.C. HITT centers. "We all came together to brainstorm what the Marines would be doing for the athletic events."

The events for the championship are drafted by HITT instructors and confirmed by a board of various Marine Corps fitness specialists.

"It's a grind, straight grit," said Staff Sgt. Scott Frank, a competitor from MCB Camp Pendleton. "You can't just be good at one thing.

"You have to be well rounded physically and mentally."

The seven events for the 2019 HITT Championship included a marksmanship simulator, combat fitness test, weighted run, combat swimmer challenge, obstacle course, pugil stick fight, BeaverFit assault rig, live-fire fitness challenge, and HITT combine.

"We run through it ourselves so we can understand what they are going through too," said Atkins.

The intensity and nature of the challenges, create a risk of injury. To mitigate an ambulance is always on site and numerous medical personnel were present. The Marines are also being monitored closely by high-tech equipment that records their heart rates, core temperature and other vital information, which gives an in-depth idea of their overall health provided by Western Virginia University.

"The tactical drill was my probably my favorite because it included live-fire, and it was awesome to see how your body reacts to being under physical and mental duress," said 1st Lt. Frances Moore, a competitor from MCAS Iwakuni, Japan.

The competitors are awarded points based on each timed event. The goal at the end of the competition is to have the most points. The championship culminates at the end of day four, when the scores have been determined and the male and female champions are awarded.

"They come in and train every single day and get coaching advice from all the staff," said Frank. "Then I get to come here and actually see them put all that effort into the competition."

MILITARY TRUSTED BUSINESSES

© 2019 - MARCOA Media